Wednesday, 19 March 2014

New stick-on diabetes device offers a break from finger pricking

Diabetics who must prick their fingers to test levels every day often end up with sore and calloused hands – which is why needle-free devices are always a welcome arrival in the treatment market.

New glucose sensor on the scene that can be worn on the back of the upper arm and monitors glucose levels for up to 14 days. The Libre sensor can work for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and it continuously monitors blood sugar levels from a 5mm-long prong that is nestled under the skin and reacts with bodily fluids.

Finger pricking can lead to poor diabetes control if patients struggle to prick often enough due to irritation or inconvenience. “Finger-¬pricking is a hassle and can be embarrassing,". "Many people forget to do it so don’t have a complete ¬picture of their condition. Failing to control long-term ¬diabetes can cause diabetic ¬retino¬pathy, renal failure and foot comp¬lications that can lead to ¬amputation."

Without consistent readings, patients can't get an accurate picture of their daily blood sugar patterns – a problem the new sensor aims to solve. The Libre can store up to eight hours worth of data before it must be downloaded, and it can work through clothing. If approved, the device could be on the market for sale later this year.

1 comment:

  1. Device could lead to better diabetes management

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